SouthernPrepper1: How to protect yourself from Ebola for $10

Unfortunately, here is the reality from Watcher:

These are appropriate PPE kit suggestions for many contagious infectious diseases, but Ebola is not one of them, to prevent cross contact contamination.

Tyvek suits and paper fiber N95 to N100 masks will not be adequate protection if you are applying direct physical contact and rendering care to an active Ebola patient.

Unfortunately, the videos and still shots that are being used by the media to date are advocating misinformation by depicting bad examples of what should be worn or used in the treatment of Ebola carriers or infected patients.

It shows non-pressurized Tyvek garb and simple face shielded hoods that were being used in Sierra Leona Africa. That is because these simple isolation kits and lots of bleach solution are what they had available for PPE’s (personal protective equipment) and sanitation, and that is what they used. That is until, WHO and CDC provided them with appropriate Pressurized Air Filtered Containment Suits and Hoods. That advanced level and expensive PPE equipment is what is required to wear if you are administering physical contact care to an active Ebola patient. Remember and keep in mind also that the incubation period for Ebola is anywhere from 4 to 22 days.

I also need to emphasize that those 3M paper fiber masks are not re-usable, they are disposables. They require and must also be timely and frequently replaced. This should be done when the moisture from your mouth and nose penetrates through the fibers to be able to visually see moisture on the outer surface of those disposable masks. You can gauge this by a noticeable darkening of the outer mask color due to the moisture laden area from your respirations. The Tyvek suits should be disposed of after one use, or replaced if they accidentally get punctured or torn. Bleach should be diluted and used in specific designated pump sprayers on all hard surfaces and soaking used goggles in. Don’t forget to wear protective goggles, even if you wear eyeglasses. If they have any elastic on them, they must be disposed of after use and not sanitized and reused. So purchase good quality goggles that have hard surface side shields on the earpieces to guard your eyes and face against splashing liquids or body fluids. My suggestion is to test wear one of the disposable masks now, and make sure they completely cover your nose and mouth. There should be no gaps or bulging of the paper mask around your face. Wear it while you are doing some active physical activity. Note how long it takes before that mask becomes visibly moist. Then use that test result to estimate how many total masks you must procure for each member of your medical team to have on your shelf stock. Remember that the incubation period for each specific infectious disease is different and varies, so add in the length of treatment factor in your supplies needed as well. Have enough protective garb kits for two cycles and enough bleach on hand for at least three complete time cycles of the infectious diseases longest incubation period for your shelf stock.

Double bag all infectious material. Incineration, is preferred inside of a enclosed receptacle, burned far downwind of your inhabitance and any others. If not possible, deep burial 4 ft, deep and covered, mark the area, it is not to be disturbed.

Watcher

      
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6 Responses to SouthernPrepper1: How to protect yourself from Ebola for $10

  1. Catherine says:

    What is the safest way to dispose of contaminated PPE, bedding, etc?

  2. watcher says:

    This is a lengthy commentary so it is being submitted in two or three sections.

    These are appropriate PPE kit suggestions for many contagious infectious diseases, but Ebola is not one of them, to prevent cross contact contamination.

    Tyvek suits and paper fiber N95 to N100 masks will not be adequate protection if you are applying direct physical contact and rendering care to an active Ebola patient.

    Unfortunately, the videos and still shots that are being used by the media to date are advocating misinformation by depicting bad examples of what should be worn or used in the treatment of Ebola carriers or infected patients.

    It shows non-pressurized Tyvek garb and simple face shielded hoods that were being used in Sierra Leona Africa. That is because these simple isolation kits and lots of bleach solution are what they had available for PPE’s (personal protective equipment) and sanitation, and that is what they used. That is until, WHO and CDC provided them with appropriate Pressurized Air Filtered Containment Suits and Hoods. That advanced level and expensive PPE equipment is what is required to wear if you are administering physical contact care to an active Ebola patient. Remember and keep in mind also that the incubation period for Ebola is anywhere from 4 to 22 days.

  3. watcher says:

    I also need to emphasize that those 3M paper fiber masks are not re-usable, they are disposables. They require and must also be timely and frequently replaced. This should be done when the moisture from your mouth and nose penetrates through the fibers to be able to visually see moisture on the outer surface of those disposable masks. You can gauge this by a noticeable darkening of the outer mask color due to the moisture laden area from your respirations. The Tyvek suits should be disposed of after one use, or replaced if they accidentally get punctured or torn. Bleach should be diluted and used in specific designated pump sprayers on all hard surfaces and soaking used googles in. Don’t forget to wear protective goggles, even if you wear eyeglasses. If they have any elastic on them, they must be disposed of after use and not sanitized and reused. So purchase good quality goggles that have hard surface side shields on the earpieces to guard your eyes and face against splashing liquids or body fluids. My suggestion is to test wear one of the disposable masks now, and make sure they completely cover your nose and mouth. There should be no gaps or bulging of the paper mask around your face. Wear it while you are doing some active physical activity. Note how long it takes before that mask becomes visibly moist. Then use that test result to estimate how many total masks you must procure for each member of your medical team to have on your shelf stock. Remember that the incubation period for each specific infectious disease is different and varies, so add in the length of treatment factor in your supplies needed as well. Have enough protective garb kits for two cycles and enough bleach on hand for at least three complete time cycles of the infectious diseases longest incubation period for your shelf stock.

    Double bag all infectious material.
    Incineration, is preferred inside of a enclosed receptacle, burned far downwind of your inhabitance and any others.
    If not possible, deep burial 4 ft, deep and covered, mark the area, it is not to be disturbed.

  4. Catherine says:

    Thanks! Especially the remarks describing when a mask is used up. You also addressed my concern regarding disposal. Several years ago I saw a show about the 1918 pandemic in which present day scientists were digging up graves of people in Alaska who were thought to have died of that flu. The scientists hoped to be able to reconstruct the virus. I shuddered when I saw that. I shudder now because there are not many places
    where we can safely burn or bury such highly infectious material. Thank goodness I have Jesus!

  5. Michele says:

    So what kind of suits can the average American afford to purchase if caring for a loves one with Ebola in a situation where care by trained medical personnel is not available?

    • David says:

      Unfortunately, caring for a loved one in an Ebola pandemic where the rule of law or medical care is not available is not an option. You can watch over them and pray. Only God will be able to take care of them at that point.

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