Dual Band Ham Radio Configuration

Kenwood VHF/UHF ham radio

KENWOOD TM-V71A

The TM-V71A is a true dual-band operation radio so VHF+VHF/VHF+UHF/UHF+UHF operation is possible. The detachable control head is easily connected with the optional remote cable.

Frequency Coverage: 144-148 and 430-450 MHz TX, 118-524 and 800-1000 MHz RX
50 Watts RF Output
Crossband repeat
1010 Memory Channels, with 6-digit alpha-tagging
Built-In EchoLink Functionality with 10 Dedicated Memories
Invertible Head Unit with 2-Color Display (Amber or Green)

Manufacturer’s Website
Product Website

link to buy

Alinco power supply

ALINCO DM-430T

Ultra-compact, lightweight and high-powered switching power supply with Power Poles..!

The DM-430 features include a large illuminated digital Volt/Amp meter, rear panel binding posts/front panel Anderson Power Poles (30A peak), voltage adjust (5-15V) or fixed at 13.8V, ripple less than 80mVp-p and protection for short-circuit, over temperature, and current limiting!

FEATURES:

  • Voltage Control: The output voltage is continuously adjustable from 5 to 15 Volt DC, or fixed at rated 13.8V.
  • Forced Air Cooling: Designed with reliability in mind, a durable cooling fan keeps DM-430 running continuously under heavy loads.
  • Large Binding Posts: The main output terminals are large enough to provide an e..cient power transfer to your equipment.
  • Volt & Amp Meter Auxiliary Output: A highly visible, accurate digital Volt / Amp meter allows real-time monitoring of the output current.
  • Auxiliary Output Terminals (30A max.): Added front panel Anderson Power Pole.. terminals provides versatility and quick connections. The output voltage is continuously adjustable from 5 to 15 Volt DC, or fixed at rated 13.8V.

link to buy

Diamond base station antenna

DIAMOND X-30A

Special Features:

  • Fiberglass Radome
  • Stainless Steel Hardware
  • Wide Band Performance
  • Factory Adjusted – No Tuning Required
  • High Wind Rating
  • DC Grounded

Specifications:

  • Band: 2m/70cm
  • Gain (dB): 3.0/5.5
  • Max Power Rating: 150 Watts
  • Wind Rating: 135 MPH (no ice)
  • Height (feet): 4.5
  • Connector: UHF
  • Element Phasing: 1-1/2l, 2-5/8l

Remarks: Works well in areas where height and/or antenna restrictions are an issue.

** Same Antenna As The vX30A

Manufacturer’s Website
Product Website

link to buy

Antenna coax

This is 50′. You may need more or less depending on the measurement from the base of the antenna to the TM-V71.

Chameleon Antenna CHA 50 COAX WITH RFI

50′ of RG-58A

2 X PL-259 Connectors

1 X Integrated RFI

Choke at the top of the cable

link to buy

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This is a recommended configuration for a dual band system. This unit can be used as a mobile unit also. The antenna for a mobile station is not the same as a base station antenna. The base station antenna can be mounted using a regular satellite base. I bought mine at a directv store but you can buy them at hardware stores or online.

David DeGerolamo

      
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Guido
Guido
1 month ago

Hello, David
Scored the stuff you recommended along with programming stuff and a guide.
I reckon I’ll need both, heavy on the instructions. I’m facing a steep learning curve.

Thanks for your help, Sir.

Brewer55
Brewer55
1 month ago

Thank you for posting this. I copied it and put it on a local Word doc on my PC.

RONALD PARKS
RONALD PARKS
1 month ago

The Kenwood is a good radio, no argument here! However I personally preferer the Icom ID-5100A . Like the Kenwood, it is dual mode cross band FM receiver/transmitter with a 50 Watt output but it also has the D-Star mode. While D-Star’s world wide network will not work if the internet is down (although there is some interrepeater functionality when the D-star repeaters are interconnected through their 23 centimeter nodes). D-Star however will function quite well in the simplex mode. Not only are D-Star simplex much more clear and static free than FM analog but the viable signals tend to travel a slightly longer distance. I have verified this through personal experimentation. Another thing that could be an asset (or a deterrent) is that only people with D-Star radios can understand your transmissions. It just sounds like a static burst to anyone listening on a standard analog FM receiver. Commercial scanners can decode some digital modes (like DMR, P25, and NXDN) but the only way to hear a D-Star transmission is with a D-Star radio. That’s not saying that the government doesn’t have the ability to decode D-Star (I’m certain they do). However, it is not as wide open as FM analog and certain other digital modes. They cost a little more than the Kenwood but the have some nice features like a separate head that can be mounted remote to the radio body and removed from the vehicle for security purposes as well as a touch screen tan makes makes remote operations much simpler. Here’s a link (same store).

https://www.hamradio.com/detail.cfm?pid=H0-014084

RONALD PARKS
RONALD PARKS
1 month ago

I thought of something else. You might want to consider the Mars Mod (listed below the radio with the accessories. This “Opens up the radio to frequencies where you would not be authorized to transmit. You can listen, however and may be able to use the information you hear to your advantage. I think it costs about $35.00 from HRO or Gigaparts.com and, if they do it, it doesn’t void the warranty.

Lordchamp
Lordchamp
1 month ago

I need some advice please. There appears to be some very knowledgeable hams on here.

I have my technician’s license. I could get my general if needed.

I’m on a very limited fixed income yet I fully see the need for some form of communication such as ham.

HF is certainly the best way to go it seems for both distance and the number of various frequencies you can communicate on.

However, we all know the main focus needs to be locally.

SO, knowing repeaters might not always be available. Would a dual band setup like this suffice for local communications covering a state or maybe even multi-state area without the use of repeaters or is that going to require HF?

Lordchamp
Lordchamp
1 month ago
Reply to  DRenegade

That’s what I thought but was hoping I had missed something.

Any advice on the least expensive, yet reasonably well made HF setup then? No need spending what I have on junk but can’t afford top of line either.

tangle
1 month ago
Reply to  Lordchamp

Xigue G90 is the best cheap HF rig. I have one and have no issues with it.

Lordchamp
Lordchamp
1 month ago
Reply to  tangle

Thanks Tangle I’ll check it out.

tangle
1 month ago
Reply to  Lordchamp

Forgot, if you can find a Yaesu FT-857D in good condition it would be worth the money.

Lordchamp
Lordchamp
1 month ago

Is there any kind of SC/NC commo net that would be applicable to these level of radios or is that going to require HF capability?

I’m somewhat of a computer geek so the digital aspect is really attracting me too.

Lordchamp
Lordchamp
1 month ago
Reply to  DRenegade

Sigh…I figured as much but never hurts to ask. Thanks David