New York Committee and Council of Safety

To aid the war effort and fill the void of civil government left when British colonial institutions collapsed, the Continental Congress recommended each colony establish a committee of safety to execute resolutions – especially when the legislature adjourned.1 Smaller than the cumbersomely large Provincial Congress, the New York Committee of Safety could act more efficiently. Occupying a somewhat vague position within both the civil government and military hierarchy, the short-term Committee worked with General George Washington to preserve order amidst the ongoing struggle. Commencing July 11, 1775, the Committee received ambiguous orders and tentatively assumed it responsibilities: responding to government letters, executing resolutions, obliging Continental Army officials “as far as…[the Committee] shall think proper,” directing the military when in New York, and administering finances.2 In fact, as civil bulwarks, the Committee and later the Council of Safety (the slight nomenclature alteration came after independence) even operated until early 1778 – well after New York ratified a constitution. These bodies helped stabilize the state until the formal government initiated. Originally conceived as executive bodies, the Committee and Council eventually received all the Convention’s powers.

Specifically designated as New York’s civil authority, the Committee needed to act efficiently – especially in regards to aiding Washington’s war effort. Regularly corresponding with the Provincial Congress and Committee of Safety, Washington notified officials of potential invasions to at risk areas so necessary defensive preparations could commence. Recognizing the Committee’s authority and, more importantly, the necessity of working with executive bodies, Washington even solicited the Committee’s aid procuring military supplies and recruits. Despite Washington’s desires and the Committee’s strives to meet demands, the executive institution was not always successful.3 Facing mounting obstacles, the Committee and its successor endeavored to meet Washington’s demands for weapons through a variety of means. Arguably one of the executive body’s more controversial methods called upon local boards to disarm both loyalists and inhabitants who refused the Association as well as impress materials for the military’s use.

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Jane
Jane
1 month ago

I was not aware of this. Thank you for sharing this important historical data. And now? How will we the people manage when all falls apart?

EddieHnatko
EddieHnatko
1 month ago
Reply to  Jane

I suspect that a communication grid-down situation might be the best-case scenario. It would give locals an opportunity to organize in their best interest without the need to telegraph their objectives to the world. It might also be the catalyst that finally unifies folks who are presently too busy with their everyday lives to be bothered by incidentals that we discuss here.

Jane
Jane
1 month ago
Reply to  EddieHnatko

Yes, communication grid down; perhaps dump cell phones, too, if there is not a grid down. Your right. The more I read NC Ren, the more I realize everyone is still snoozing.

Al Bino
Al Bino
1 month ago

Things the Phd overlooked or obfuscated:
After the war, shipping soldiers back to England was expensive. So the king allowed anyone willing to stay behind ‘citizenship’, if they were willing to run for office or become government administrators. Which is, to my knowledge, the first time the word was ever mentioned in Colonial era documents.
Executive positions didn’t exist, as that word is exclusively the head of a Corporation. Originally the three branches were Administrative, Judicial, and Legislative. Administrative was changed to Executive after the Great Rebellion, when Esquire Lincoln’s Executive Order declared the United States for America bankrupt. Which caused the incorporation of the U.S. in the State of Delaware, occurring after his death. The State of Delaware doesn’t require Corporations to disclose ownership.
Words matter, and it’s why bank customers are considered decedents. Who will be the zombies? Just about everyone will be the zombies. The more we feed the cabal, the harder thing will become. Anyone know a coroner who gives out a certificates of life??