Are You Zeroed? Vigilance Elite – Spec Ops Dude’s Favorite Combat Rifle Zero

      
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NC Rob
NC Rob
1 month ago

I LOVE the VE videos. I was just watching a 4.5 hour one with DJ Shipley…good lord what an emotional rollercoaster but amazing interview.

Chris
Chris
1 month ago

Ahhh….it is the 36.
I saw another bearded dude run this and tryed it.
Made perfect sense.
It works for me, in my “Reality.”

Give it a shot.

tom finley
tom finley
1 month ago
Reply to  Chris

I usually set up sight with a bore sight laser and then tweek it at the range.

Last edited 1 month ago by tom finley
tom finley
tom finley
1 month ago

Great and informative video, how would I zero my quad 50 cal? Just wishing For my Christmas gift.

Last edited 1 month ago by tom finley
NC Rob
NC Rob
1 month ago
Reply to  tom finley

Quad 50 cal? Do you want any kids?

tom finley
tom finley
1 month ago
Reply to  NC Rob

No at my age Rob they are all raised and settled. I will give them hints at where to find my christmas list tho.

RHT447
RHT447
1 month ago

Here’s another good video by Travis Haley, shot a distance. Personally, I prefer the 50/200 yard zero.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DFbpjNh4DBA
I’m running one of these--
https://www.midwayusa.com/product/1018441862?pid=898760

tom finley
tom finley
1 month ago
Reply to  RHT447

Yes good stuff, depends on what your using 5.56 or 7.62 the higher velocity 5.56 is leaving the barrel at around 3200 to 3300 fps and it is still just a 22. The 7.62 used or mia garrand lower velocity but still able to knock down steel targets at a thousnd yards is my preferred batlle rifle. The snipers in viet-nam preferred weapon.

FedUpFLman
FedUpFLman
1 month ago
Reply to  tom finley

Which 7.62 rifles are best bang for buck? Seems like you know them well. I used to have better shot with the AK over the AR. Now they have gotten so expensive though, not sure which are still good and reasonable priced also. Thanks

tom finley
tom finley
1 month ago
Reply to  FedUpFLman

Springfield armory for the m1a and another good choice is the FAL still used world wide. AK is a proven battle weapon also.

tom finley
tom finley
1 month ago
Reply to  FedUpFLman

Left out the ar15 can also be purchased in 7.62 hope that helps.

Georgiaboy61
Georgiaboy61
1 month ago
Reply to  FedUpFLman

If traditional rifles appeal to you, then maybe an M1A (civilian-legal semi-auto only M-14 type rifle) or an FN FAL pattern one. Be warned, though: Neither is cheap. A Springfield Armory M1A standard model starts in the $1600 range, and about that much will be needed to get you into a new DSA SA58. “DSA” is an American company making FAL-pattern rifles, BTW.
AR10s and AR-308s have come a long way. Armalite owns the name “AR10” so the rest of the industry had to come up with other names for AR-pattern rifles in .308. New, you are probably looking at the same price range. A Smith and Wesson M&P 10 will run you about the same price as the ones above, but has the benefit of using industry standard Magpul-type fiberglass/plastic 20-rd. mags.
There are other companies making this style of rifle, too many to list -- but the prices start above a grand and then go up from there.
Bargain basement, you can look for something used, or maybe a PTR 91 GI or GI-R, which is a civilian-legal replica of the CETME/G3 Cold War-era battle rifle used by Spain, Germany and many other nations. Roller-lock delayed blowback rifles are not to everyone’s taste, but some people love them,and they are robust and tough, and can take a lot of abuse and still work. Mags are very cheap, too, which is no small thing.
Century Arms makes a CETME/G3 knock-off, too, which can sometimes be had for $700-800 bucks. They’re parts guns, using a combination of U.S. made (to meet legal regs) and foreign-sourced military-surplus parts. PTR makes some of the parts, BTW. Century being Century, some of them run great and some stink.
A final idea: If the idea doesn’t turn your stomach, the Polytech M305 sometimes shows up for sale in the U.S. and they are quite common in Canada. Polytech is a Chinese firm, owned in part by the People’s Liberation Army of the PRC. Strange world, right? -- the communist Chinese making M-14 knock-offs. But they’re pretty good rifles for the money. And ifyou bought a used one, you wouldn’t be benefiting them -- for what it is worth.
There is the “old-school” solution, especially if you like iron sights, which is to get an M-1 Garand chambered in 7.62 NATO/.308. If the CMP can’t sell you one already in that caliber,they can rebarrel it for you. CMP = Civilian Marksmanship Program…..

Original Grandpa
Original Grandpa
1 month ago
Reply to  tom finley

some of us used a Remington action in 30.06, built by our Marine armorers.

tom finley
tom finley
1 month ago

Well we need you now, Semper fi

Original Grandpa
Original Grandpa
1 month ago
Reply to  tom finley

well, Tom; I’m old and broken down; but I’m still here; and still a Marine, just not active duty, ha ha. Although distance for record is a perishable skill, it is one that’s easier to keep up than rucking weight. I can’t run and gun with you youngsters any more, but I am patient, and still hold that one skill -- reaching out to touch somebody -- almost as well as when it was new…and there’s a lot of us out here. We keep in touch.
Semper Fi, brother. Be safe and be blessed

strider 777
strider 777
1 month ago

If memory serves me correctly, I believe the Remington 30.06 was Carlos Hathcock’s preferred rifle. He had great success with it.

strider 777
strider 777
1 month ago
Reply to  strider 777

I stand corrected; it was a Winchester .30-06 Hathcock (a.k.a. “White Feather”) used. I’m getting a bit foggy in my elder years.

Georgiaboy61
Georgiaboy61
1 month ago
Reply to  strider 777

@ Strider777
If memory serves, Gunnery Sergeant Hathcock’s rifle during his first tour as a scout-sniper, was a Winchester M70 30-06, which was a standard model with a heavy target or varmint barrel, which had then been worked over & accurized by Marine armorers and fitted with an 8x Unertl scope. During his third tour (second as a scout-sniper), for part of it, he used a Remington M700, which under USMC nomenclature was known as the M40, in 7.62x51 NATO. The Corps had switched calibers and rifle manufacturers in 1966.
Oh, ok -- I see you corrected yourself…. never mind!

tom finley
tom finley
1 month ago

Forgot to thank you for your service.

strider 777
strider 777
1 month ago
Reply to  tom finley

Yes, the 5.56 x 45 mm (55gr, FMJ) at 100 yds. is approx. 993 Ft-lbs. of energy.
The .308 (150 gr, FMJ) at 550 yds. is still approx. 992 Ft-lbs. of energy.
BIG difference.

tom finley
tom finley
1 month ago
Reply to  strider 777

You know another thing about one of our supposed hero’s of that conflict John Mcain and his torture at the hands of the N. Vietnamese was that the aircraft that he was shot down in had a narrower cockpit and upon ejection his shoulders hit the canopy, the shoulder injuries were not from torture.

Georgiaboy61
Georgiaboy61
1 month ago
Reply to  tom finley

@ Tom Finley
If you are a Garand man, or for that matter, an M1A/M14 type (the sights are the same, except for being graduated in meters rather than yards, as with the M-1), you probably know that the front sight post of an M-1 is a range-finder equal to the shoulder width of the standard military silhouette at 250 yards or so. If your front post is 8 moa, then at 250 yards, it is precisely as wide as an 18-inch silhouette. The rifle is made to be battle-sight zeroed at that range, which will put the soldier on target with a center-mass hold 0-300 yards.
If the target is wider than the post, you know it lies within your BSZ; if it is narrower, then you know that you’ll either have to dial in additional elevation or hold over. And so on and so forth.
Of course, the soldiers and Marines using Garands with scopes didn’t need to worry about iron sights, but even with irons, an M-1 is extremely accurate out to distances beyond what most folks think iron sights will do.
In the Korean War, specifically in 1950-1951, Marine Staff Sergeant John Boitnott and his spotter made confirmed kills of enemy communist personnel at ranges up to 1250 yards, and he was only using a 2.5x or maybe a 4x power scope! No match ammo around so they used 30-06 AP “black tip” instead and tried to horde the lots they found to be accurate.

tom finley
tom finley
1 month ago
Reply to  Georgiaboy61

Thank you great info, I trained with the ar in basic and ait at fort ord in 1968 one month after turning 17. Quite along time ago.

DRenegade
Admin
1 month ago
Reply to  RHT447

I agree. Based on local terrain, 50 yard sight.

Dan Patterson
Dan Patterson
1 month ago

Very good information and intuitively correct.

tom finley
tom finley
1 month ago

Yes and another good point is aim lower shooting uphill or down hill..

tom finley
tom finley
1 month ago

Sorry for blowing up the chat but this is one of my favorites, I just wanted to add one more item to my christmas list. A set of tandem m-60 machine guns just like they used in helos for the door gunner. At 3600 rounds per minute per gun.

Last edited 1 month ago by tom finley
J.Smith
J.Smith
1 month ago

The old statistic, not sure of more recent ones, most combat engagements are under 150 yards, yes there will be exceptions based off my 31 years as a military and contract weapons instructor, former-special tactics operator, WEPTAC Chief, and LEO experience and training. For civilian use and defense, is anyone considering 300 yard shots outside of shtf, or red dawn? If so, Im going to my AR-10 setup, now im dialing them in, or adjusting mils on the fly. A 50 yard is better. As i have witnessed even among highly trained, with average shooters, abysmal, hit ratios past 200 with an M-4 are pretty low especially in field conditions, even with ACOGs, worse with red dots. In the off chance, even on my 20+ acre wooded ranch i need to shoot anything past 100, or even 200 I’ll adjust appropriately, say a coyote comes by, I prefer the precision within the 0-200 range better. Good food for thought, fun stuff to play with. Many guys are still doing 1″ high at 100 deer hunting zeros, so good stuff hopefully this helps some folks either way, both 36 and 50 are good zeros based on your needs.